Responsible Couch Ownership

Greetings from Halifax, where we are in the part of winter where it snows, then rains, then freezes, then thaws, and this cycle continues. I am seated on a soon-to-be-replaced futon with Black Lightning on TV and a fat cat slumbering against my hip. The weekends are too damned short.

The futon is soon to be replaced because my dear wife and I decided to be practical with our shared Xmas gift this year, deciding at the last minute to buy a new sofa instead of a Nintendo Switch. The sofa was a special order that is due to arrive soon. I’m not sure what will become of the futon yet. In any case we are taking this opportunity to rearrange the apartment a little, get more organized and such.

This gave me a good reason to try to learn Sketchup again, and this time I think it worked. I made a simple 3D map of our living room and the furniture, grouped the planes, moved and rotated them around, learned some of the shortcut keys. I think that’s when you know you are a serious user of any graphics application- when you know the shortcut keys.

LivingRoom

My wife has been sick all week and I felt pretty low-energy myself for a couple of days, but otherwise the end of January passed without complaint. I did manage to get some penciling done one a new short comic that I hope to get done in the next week or two. The resulting mini-comic will be the first exclusive printed thing for my Patreon.

There is a fun-sounding afternoon comic convention called Fog City Comic-con, organized by the public library in my former home city of Saint John, New Brunswick. This will its second year, occurring from 11-4 on Sunday, May 6th. I was just debating with myself earlier this week about applying for a table and making the drive and so on, when someone from the library kindly invited me to attend as a guest, maybe do a panel of some kind, so I took that as a sign and said yes. Assuming all goes as planned, that will be my first con appearance for 2018. I will update the appearances page with details for that and upcoming shows as details become available. And Fog City, thanks very much for the invite!

Speaking of comics, my LCS is the wonderful, Eisner-Award-winning Strange Adventures in Halifax. They were having a prize draw where a ballot would be entered for you if you picked up your pull list promptly, and I won this month! The prize included a copy of the Marvel 75th Anniversary Omnibus, a fancy Batman figurine, and several trade paperbacks. So that was a nice surprise, and let that be a lesson to you all- if you have a pull list at a comic shop, pick your books up promptly!

That’s all I can think of to say for this week. I haven’t posted them yet but there will be updates to Faith of the Heart, The Insult, and Sunday Night in Cinema 3 later today. I also started designing a sort of welcome package thing for Patreon a few days ago, and came up with a name for a card game I’m working on. I think I will try to have some prototypes ready to sell for this spring’s shows. More on that as this month goes on. In the meantime, thanks as always for reading.

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One Last Push…

2017

Hard to believe it’s almost Halloween. Last weekend was my last show of the year, the Halifax Pop Explosion Zine Fest, and I had a good time.

If you’re interested, I did manage to put together a new illustrated zine for it, an adaptation of Carmaig DeForest’s song “Hey Judas”, which was originally written as a takedown of then-President Reagan. I updated it for the current occupant of the Really White House and created some illustrations that depict what Hell would be like for Donald Trump. I decided to make it an extra challenge for myself by making the zine through 100% analog tools; it was all hand-drawn, painted and lettered. Fun, right? Anyway, there are a limited number of printed copies of the zine left – I will list it in my comics/zine store for those who want it.

As you can see in the picture for this post, there is also a new print called “Donair Trail” that borrows the design of some Nova Scotia provincial highway signs. I’m going to look into local distribution but if you are out of the HRM and would like one, you can order through InPrnt.

One of my goals for 2017, after a 2016 where I did some shows but was a bit disappointed with the results, was that I was going to upgrade the things I had to offer; I wanted to collect and publish some of my favourite older material, create and publish some new books, and work harder in general on the quality of my illustrations and prints. Overall, I feel like I have achieved those goals, so that feels good. Having the books available for sale, especially The Insult and Young & Dumb, had a positive impact on sales and generated some very welcome feedback. It was interesting and invigorating to “level up” my publishing efforts from trying to do everything myself to working with print on demand. I feel like it helped me turn a page, if you’ll pardon the pun.

There is still some older material I want to publish, most notably my old MA thesis as a monograph and my first three NaNoWriMo novels, but they all need significant editing, so if I can get those done by this time next year, that would be great. Of course I also want to get some new comics done, and illustrations, and perhaps look into listing my stuff on digital services like Comixology. I have also been thinking about a new project that would consume a good chunk of time, but I think it would be a fun challenge, so… we’ll see.

If it sounds like I am talking as if it’s the end of the year, it’s because it kind of is for me. The last few years I have been loosely planning my projects month by month, with a general plan for the entire year done in advance so that I can try to have something new to launch at the shows that I do.

But the end of the year has pretty much been the same since 2014: in October I do Inktober, a daily challenge for artists to draw something in ink every day. I’ve been doing it this year too- you can see it on my Instagram– and I think this year has been my best overall.

In November I’ve been doing National Novel Writing Month, a great way for experienced and amateur writers  to quickly knock out the first draft of a novel and raise money for school writing programs. I was able to complete the challenge on my first two tries but came up short last year due to some personal issues. I’m about to do it again for this year, so wish me luck.

December is not exactly a month off – I usually wind up doing an illustration or two for xmas presents, plus I draw custom gift tags and plan projects for the next year. Mostly I try to relax and enjoy time with family and recharge.

So, yeah; one last push for this year- NaNoWriMo- and then the holidays and snow and all that will be upon us. I’ll try to post here a little more often, especially about the new stuff as it becomes available. If you’ve made it this far, thanks as always for your support. I hope you have a great remainder of  the year. I hope we all do.

 

Duncan the Wonder Dog: Show One

This is the first volume of a projected 2600-page opus by young cartoonist Adam Hines, set in an alternate world where animals can talk. Other than that, the world is much like ours in that we humans still raise and slaughter animals for food, and keep them as pets; as a result it is by turns heartbreaking and horrifying. The first volume introduces many characters and themes, but it primarily revolves around Pompeii, a Barbary macaque that is the leader of an animal terrorist group; and Jack Hammond, a human FBI agent who pursues Pompeii after the bombing of a California college library. Pompeii and his hench-ape spend a chunk of time hiding in the home of a wealthy family, leading to a particularly haunting passage where Pompeii reads the diary of the mother who lived there.

The ambition, complexity, and artistry of this book cannot be understated. It frequently reminded me of another great series about man’s relationship with nature; The Puma Blues by Stephen Murphy and Michael Zulli. The art reminded me of the tragically aborted Alan Moore/Bill Sinkiewicz series Big Numbers, by Hines’ use of collage, graphite, ink and mixed media. He employs mathematical principles to design panel and page layouts, reflecting the natural world that he depicts. Long silent passages of the camera drifting over darkened wheat fields or forests give way to human streets and buildings rendered in line art. Like Chris Ware, Hines employs a variety of visual devices and metaphors to compartmentalize the narrative, without losing the tension that runs throughout.

In short, Adam Hines and his book are the real deal. I read most of Duncan the Wonder Dog last night, and found difficult to put down and difficult to sleep afterward. It’s not for the faint of heart; great books or art never are.

You can read Duncan the Wonder Dog online here.