Relish by Lucy Knisley

Relish by Lucy Knisley is a charming graphic novel set for release from First Second in the spring of 2013 (in the meantime you can read an excerpt and other comics on her website). It is primarily a memoir of her childhood, recalling how her parents instilled within her a love of cooking and of fine foods. While it does touch on some painful moments here and there – her parents’ divorce, and her own tendency to use food for comfort – it never becomes maudlin. Instead she concentrates on different aspects of food, from working on a farm to serving as a caterer, enjoying the foods of different cultures, cooking for friends in college, and fine dining with her father. Knisley also eschews food snobbery, extolling the virtues of McDonalds french fries and occasional junk food.

Knisley’s linework is very clean and energetic, reminding me of Shary Flenniken; it is complimented well by her bright and vibrant colour palette. Best of all, each chapter of Relish ends with a recipe, cooking tips, or both (I plan on trying the instructions for making sushi, among others).

I found a lot to identify with in this book: a love of cooking and of fine food, the experience of parental divorce, and of having ancestors who either cooked professionally or could have if they had wished to. But I don’t think those kinds of touchstones are necessary to enjoy Relish; like good food, its appeal is universal.

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Duncan the Wonder Dog: Show One

This is the first volume of a projected 2600-page opus by young cartoonist Adam Hines, set in an alternate world where animals can talk. Other than that, the world is much like ours in that we humans still raise and slaughter animals for food, and keep them as pets; as a result it is by turns heartbreaking and horrifying. The first volume introduces many characters and themes, but it primarily revolves around Pompeii, a Barbary macaque that is the leader of an animal terrorist group; and Jack Hammond, a human FBI agent who pursues Pompeii after the bombing of a California college library. Pompeii and his hench-ape spend a chunk of time hiding in the home of a wealthy family, leading to a particularly haunting passage where Pompeii reads the diary of the mother who lived there.

The ambition, complexity, and artistry of this book cannot be understated. It frequently reminded me of another great series about man’s relationship with nature; The Puma Blues by Stephen Murphy and Michael Zulli. The art reminded me of the tragically aborted Alan Moore/Bill Sinkiewicz series Big Numbers, by Hines’ use of collage, graphite, ink and mixed media. He employs mathematical principles to design panel and page layouts, reflecting the natural world that he depicts. Long silent passages of the camera drifting over darkened wheat fields or forests give way to human streets and buildings rendered in line art. Like Chris Ware, Hines employs a variety of visual devices and metaphors to compartmentalize the narrative, without losing the tension that runs throughout.

In short, Adam Hines and his book are the real deal. I read most of Duncan the Wonder Dog last night, and found difficult to put down and difficult to sleep afterward. It’s not for the faint of heart; great books or art never are.

You can read Duncan the Wonder Dog online here.

Bigfoot Boy: Into the Woods

I had the pleasure of reading an advance copy of Bigfoot Boy: Into the Woods by J. Torres and Faith Erin Hicks recently. It’s an all-ages graphic novel about Rufus, a ten-year-old boy who spends a long weekend at his grandmother’s house in British Columbia. Bored, he follows a neighbour girl called Penny into the woods and gets a little lost; in his attempt to find his way back he finds a strange necklace with a totem carved on one side and “sasquatch” on the other. Like a Canadian Captain Marvel, he discovers that when he says the word on the necklace, he is struck by lightning and turned into a sasquatch (or Bigfoot, for American readers). He takes this pretty much in stride and soon befriends a talking flying squirrel called Sidney. When he says the magic word backwards, he returns to human form (sans clothes). Unfortunately for Rufus, there are others who want to use the power of the necklace. Sidney and Penny help him understand his new powers so that he can survive and protect the forest.

I enjoyed this book very much and will be buying a copy for my own ten-year-old boy when it is released by Kids Can Press in September. Torres is a YA comics veteran and Shuster award winning writer that I have followed since his Copybook Tales minicomics, and Faith Erin Hicks is a talented Halifax artist with comics like the charming Superhero Girl and Friends With Boys under her belt. They make a great team here; Torres’ script is fun and well-paced for the preteen audience, and Hicks’ artwork is energetic and expressive. I hope there will be more volumes to come!

In the meantime, if you happen to be in the Toronto area, Torres and Hicks will be at Fan Expo Canada and launching the book at Little Island Comics in Mirvish Village on Sunday at 4 PM. Get out there and support quality all-ages and YA comics!

Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life (Colour Edition)

I am a big fan of Scott Pilgrim; my introduction to the series was to buy a copy of this book in its original incarnation from writer/artist Bryan Lee O’Malley at a book festival in Halifax. For the purposes of this review, I’m going to divide the potential reader into the following groups: 1) those who have never read the books, and 2) those who have. Whether or not you have seen the film is immaterial; the books contain a lot of additional story that is well worth reading.

So if you are in group 1, should you buy this book? Probably. I feel that the cover price is a bit steep ($25 for a colour hardcover, compared to $15 for the black and white paperback), and artwise this is the weakest of the series; but the story is still one of the smartest and sharpest things you will encounter on the shelves, and the colour by Nathan Fairbairn is very well done. The lettering has also been “remastered”, whatever that means, and the artwork generally sharpened and tweaked to show off the colour as well as possible.

And if you are in group 2? Personally, I don’t feel compelled to buy the series again in colour. Oni Press has added some nice design touches reminiscent of the film, and some “behind the scenes” material by O’Malley at the end, but I would rather save my money for O’Malley’s new book due next year (or his wife’s adaptation of A Wrinkle In Time, for that matter). Of course, your mileage may vary; I can easily imagine a hardcore SP fan replacing the paperbacks with these new hardcover editions.

The Underwater Welder

Jeff Lemire (Essex County, Sweet Tooth) recently released this original graphic novel through Top Shelf to great acclaim, and while I did enjoy it, I feel like it may be a little overpraised. Lost co-creator Damon Lindelof puts it well in his introduction: The Underwater Welder is like a lost episode of The Twilight Zone. It is the story of Jack Joseph, a diver who works on an oil rig off the coast of Nova Scotia. His very pregnant wife is frustrated that he seems to be pulling away from her when she needs him most. Jack is haunted by the loss of his father – also a diver – twenty years earlier. When Jack finds an object deep in the ocean that appears to belong to his father, he finds himself forced to choose between dwelling on the past and his future.

The Underwater Welder is certainly not a bad book. Lemire has a great, idiosyncratic art style that is its own class of Canadian folk art. As a writer, though, I wonder if he is just best suited to short stories. For all of its ambition, The Underwater Welder feels somewhat slight to me, as if it was once a story of Essex County that got promoted to a longer treatment. Lindelof’s comparison to The Twilight Zone is apt and complimentary, but it is also a bit of a curse, because not every episode of The Twilight Zone was solid gold; sometimes it felt like a bit of a formula. So, too, does The Underwater Welder.

That said, as a native of the area, I did enjoy Lemire’s vision of this small Nova Scotia town and would be happy to read more stories set there. Lemire’s tone and output as a writer reminds me of George Elliott (the Canadian author, not the Victorian pseudonym) and the American writer Sherwood Anderson; pretty good company to keep.

How to Make a Mini-Comic (Extreme Edition)

So, as you know if you are a regular reader, I managed to scrape together a mini-comic in time for last weekend’s Harbour Con-Fusion. I thought that some of you might like to know how the publishing end of it works, so here is what I did to make the “5 Seconds Summer Fun Special”:

1. Created the pages in Manga Studio. You can do this however you like, of course. You can create your pages digitally from start to finish, or you can draw them on paper the old-fashioned way and then scan them, or you can draw them and make your master pages on a photocopier, which is what I used to do. These days I prefer to do all-digital, because printing and photocopying and re-copying can result in lost gray tones. Plus, it’s the 21st century. :)

2. Laid out the master pages in Adobe InDesign, which is a publishing program. To create a booklet like a mini-comic, you need to arrange the pages so that they will be in the correct order once they are printed and stapled together. So if you have a 4-page comic on a single folded sheet of paper, the master pages will look like this:

Front – Page 4 (L) / Page 1 (R)
Back – Page 2 (L) / Page 3 (R)

The mini-comic I made was 12 pages, which means 3 sheets of paper with the pages figured out as above. An easy way to do this is to create an “ashcan”; take some sheets of paper, fold them the way your comic would be folded, and then write your page numbers on the sheets in sequence. When you’re done, unfold your ashcan and you will see how you will need to arrange your master pages so that you can duplex them (make double-sided copies) correctly.

3. Once the master pages were set up in InDesign, I printed them on my little laser printer. And here is where things got crafty. Because the style of the comic was meant to resemble an old Archie comic, I decided to print it directly onto newsprint. I found some newsprint pads at the art supply store; they were 9 by 12 inches, so I used my guillotine cutter to trim them to 8.5 by 12 inches, so the pages would be narrow enough to go through the printer.

4. Once the pages were printed, I collated them (combined one copy of each page in the correct order) and used my binding stapler to staple them in the center of the sheets.

5. With the comics stapled, I folded the pages in half. It looks like a comic now, but I’m not quite done; because not only did I want the comic to look like an Archie comic, I wanted it to be the same size as an Archie digest. So, back to the guillotine trimmer with the folded copies. I trimmed each to about 4 7/8″ wide by 6 1/2″ tall.

All done! I made about 50 copies altogether. If I ever do another printing, I don’t know if I will do it on newsprint again, but it was nice to make a unique object this time around. There are copies left, so if you want one, email me or leave a comment for details. I’ll be distributing some copies to Maritime comic shops and a few other places in the next few weeks as well, and eventually there will be a PDF available for download here.

The Hidden

Why don’t I read more Richard Sala books? The guy is a genius, and I have liked everything I have read by him. The Hidden is an excellently paced tale with roots in a classic story, a lot of macabre touches and dark humour.

It opens with what appears to be the world ending. A bearded man hides in dark corners as bizarre humanoid creatures run amok, killing everyone they see. He manages to escape the town and suddenly wakes in a cave, his beard much longer and unable to remember much about his past. He meets a young couple whose car has broken down and offers to lead them to a rest stop that might be safe. As they travel, they meet another young couple and trade stories. When they arrive at the rest stop, it does prove to be a safe place – for a while.

Sala is, to my mind, the heir to Edward Gorey as the king of dark and creepy and wonderful comics; but Sala’s style is also more contemporary, comfortably depicting both monsters and cute college girls on the same page. He combines idiosyncratic linework and lettering with a muted colour palette to create what is a unique place in comics.